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What primary school teachers love about using Vivi

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Advances in educational technology are opening up more and more opportunities to engage students in innovative and collaborative learning experiences. In many primary schools, this starts from the first day of Foundation, with teachers using screens and projectors to lead activities, and students navigating their way through iPad apps. For kids in the later years of primary school, the use of technology gets more sophisticated, as they start taking responsibility for their own projects and presentations, in preparation for the transition to secondary school. To better understand the role that Vivi is playing in this evolving educational landscape, we spoke to teachers at three primary schools to find out what they love about using Vivi, and how it’s changing the way they teach and the way their students learn.

 

Ease of use for teachers, tech savvy or not

According to Matt Markman, from Melbourne’s Roxburgh Homestead Primary School, Vivi’s usability and seamless screen-mirroring performance have driven greater integration of technology with everyday lessons. “Literally, you just sit down, you open up the application and cast your screen to the TV, and you can use it across any platform,” he says. The school previously used a range of different presentation systems, including interactive whiteboards, but “they were very cumbersome and very complicated for teachers to learn how to use them.” With Vivi, however, “teachers have been able to use it with pretty much zero teething problems.”

He points out that “even teachers who may not be as confident with that sort of technology are able to just pick it up. Technology is definitely being used more as a result.”

 

NatalieusingVivi

Natalie Harris from St Francis de Sales School, a Catholic school in the Sydney suburb of Wooloware, tells a similar story. “Vivi’s used across the school. If you go into another classroom it’s so easy to connect because everyone’s got the same technology.” And for Harris, this ease of use means she can be more efficient, not only saving time that was previously spent fiddling with cables and adaptors, but being able to use her device privately while Vivi is streaming a video or displaying other content to the shared screen.

“I might be wanting to get maths ready, but previously I couldn’t have because the children were using the screen for something else,” she says. “Now with Vivi, I can put a lesson up, go back to my computer and do things without the children being disrupted.”

Ease of use for students of all ages

Vivi’s intuitive design makes the app simple to use for students too, right down to the youngest kids. Harris’s Year 1 students, for example, have one-to-one iPads, and they took to Vivi straight away. “They engaged with it really well. Now I just say open up the Vivi app and they’re really good at knowing that they have to swipe up to turn Airplay on and connect to the classroom.” Markman backs this up. “It’s so easy to use, it doesn’t really discriminate between the young kids and the older kids.”

 

Teachers at St Peter’s Anglican Primary School in Campbelltown in Sydney have had a similar experience. Dean of ICT Stuart Connell helps the teachers integrate technology into their lessons, but also takes his own classes in ICT, so he’s uniquely positioned to see how kids interact with Vivi. “The young kids are like sponges,” he notes. “Vivi is just another app to them. They know where to look for the room code so all they need to do is find their classroom number and punch in the code.”

 

Collaborative learning and student engagement

All three teachers say that Vivi has opened up new opportunities for collaborative work in the classroom. “Having students present their work to the screen allows for immediate feedback from teacher to student, but also student to peer feedback,” says Connell. “We can all collaborate on what that student’s been working on. It’s a new element to the classroom that we haven’t had before.” Markman tells a similar story, with students presenting their work and receiving feedback in real time from their teacher and their peers.

 

From Harris’s point of view, Vivi enables her class to learn together as a group in ways that were previously impossible. “When the children finish a writing task in their books, I get them to film themselves on their iPads reading their writing,” she explains. “Then we pop that up onto the screen and the rest of the class get to listen to their stories. And that’s when we can give feedback and say, that was good, you need to put a full-stop here, etc.” Harris also puts Vivi’s Capture Screenshot feature to good use. “If someone’s written a really good sentence, we use the app to capture it on each student’s iPad and I can say, ‘Can you underline the noun? The verb?’ And so on.”

 

Harris’s young students also use Vivi to lead collaborative learning themselves. In one recent example, the class was working on information reports and one boy needed to find some information about crocodiles. With his iPad connected to Vivi, he started exploring the Taronga Park Zoo website and soon several other students had gathered around the screen to take their own notes. “I didn’t lead that. He just asked if he could search for more information, we connected him to Vivi and it got the other children going, ‘Oh, I needed that too!’”

 

It’s a neat illustration of how Vivi gives students greater control over how they learn. By sharing their work, responding to their peers’ work or using interactive features like Capture Screenshot on their own devices, they become proactive rather than passive, and this helps to keep them engaged with lesson content. It builds their self-esteem too, as Harris points out: “When a child’s done well, we can put their work up on the screen and they’re proud of it, seeing their work up there.”

 

Giving teachers the freedom to move

A big change that all of the teachers have noticed is how Vivi has freed them up to move around the classroom. They can now leave the front of the room and interact with individual students without interrupting their lesson or giving up control of the screen. “Most of our teachers were so used to having their laptops set up on their desk or on a table right near the screen, because that’s the best Wi-Fi spot or it’s where the HDMI cable is,” says Connell. “It’s just been so easy, and so much better, for them to be able to walk around, have the kids interact with the iPad that the teacher’s holding or use their own devices to project to the screen.”

 

At St Francis de Sales it’s completely changed the way their classrooms function. “Gone are the days that the teacher’s behind the desk and stationary,” says Harris. “We don’t have a desk at our school anymore! We just have a device and move around the room, instead of being stuck to a desk and stuck to a hole in the wall. The only time I have to plug my laptop in is when my battery dies!”

 

It’s a far cry from the rigid old model of the teacher dictating lessons for rote-learning by passive students. In a Vivi-enabled primary school classroom, teachers can be much more flexible, responding to the needs of their students and bringing lesson content alive, with technology and with human interaction.

 

New opportunities for tech integration

Vivi’s potential for education and inspiration isn’t confined to individual classrooms. One of Vivi’s most powerful points of difference is how it brings a school’s screens and devices together as an integrated network. Vivi features, such as Digital SignageAnalytics Dashboard and Emergency Broadcast, make specific use of this. But the network can also be used for whole-school communications that bring the school community together. For example, Roxburgh Homestead use Vivi to broadcast footage of their principal reading a book to the entire school. And in a digital-age nod to Harry Potter, they’re planning regular whole-school broadcasts of their house points leaderboard!

 

Yet another Roxburgh Homestead initiative gives arguably the most exciting indication of what’s possible with Vivi – the time they connected Vivi to a drone and put on an air show! “We were able to fly a drone and give the students a bird’s-eye view of the school,” Markman explains. “All we had to do was have the iPad that was controlling the drone connected in to Vivi, and we were able to cast that to a screen. It was fantastic!” Proof then that for Vivi-enabled primary schools and creative educators, the sky really is the limit!

 

Interested to see how Vivi can offer a solution to your schools’ screen mirroring needs?

Kearnan College students learn skills to ensure they thrive in the classroom and beyond

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Kearnan College has almost 450 students spread across Kindergarten to Year 12. Located in Manjimup, 300km south of Perth, the school has a relatively large catchment area and many older students travel by bus, some for over an hour.

Mindful that today’s students’ learning horizons need to extend beyond the four walls of the classroom, and be more flexible, the college has embarked on a digital transformation program, providing older students and teachers with a Windows 10 Lenovo device equipped with touch and a digital pen.
It’s a flexible, reliable, and highly creative technology solution that promises to give students an excellent learning environment – where and when they need it – and an important grounding in the skills that they will need to thrive in the wider world.

Eyes beyond the horizon Kearnan College students have been learning skills to ensure they thrive in the classroom and beyond.

The rationale is simple according to principal Jason Meynell; “It’s essential that kids leave school as haves, not have nots, in relation to technology.”

When Meynell was appointed principal in 2017 he found that Kearnan College lacked a consistent technology platform. Instead, computers of all vintages and form factors – PCs, Chromebooks, iPads and iMacs – were being juggled by teac hers and students. Some were in labs and used infrequently, few were accessible out of school hours.

Meanwhile, Catholic Education Western Australia (CEWA) was about to roll out its Leading Lights solution for 163 Catholic schools, intended to transform education across WA, and Meynell was enthusiastic about its potential.

“Leading Lights came at the right time, we needed to think strategically about how to use technology,” he says. Kearnan College opted to be an early adopter of Leading Lights’ Office 365 roll out, and needed a solid platform to tackle that, so turned to Solutions IT for advice on suitable devices. After a rigorous consultation process with Solutions IT, the school found a device that met all their needs.

Recognising the power of both technology consistency and capability, Kearnan College has now invested in Windows 10 Lenovo devices for students and teachers to use in school, at home, or en route (an important consideration as 50 per cent of students travel to school by bus – many for an hour or more).
Solutions IT deployed a first tranche of 300 devices, with a follow up order for 60 more, ensuring a one-to-one device ratio for students in the secondary school.

Applications making a clear impact already include Office 365, Paint 3D, Microsoft Teams and OneNote, and Minecraft Education Edition is being explored in the junior school.

“We have seen a huge transformation in how we teach since we committed to using these devices,” Meynell says.

Access to the pen and digital inking has had particular impact; “Students recently wrote lyrics to their own song, they created their own album cover using Paint 3D. This is amazing work, creativity.
“The next phase is a project to create a community newspaper with the primary schools that we are affiliated with.”

The transformation program also provided real world experience to one tech savvy Year 12 student who Kearnan College employed as an IT trainee for a day a week. To help migrate to the new environment, Solutions IT used the Setup School PCs app and Windows Configuration Designer that ensured devices were primed to connect to the school network and access key software applications.

According to Meynell the teaching staff are on board with the transformation plans and have embraced the Leading Lights Office 365 roll out, particularly for the collaboration opportunities offered by Microsoft Teams.

Joseph Claes is the college’s leader of innovation and a health, physical education and science teacher. He says that having one device across the senior school has had a streamlining impact for teachers who now only have to develop one set of content.

The adoption of OneNote has been so widespread across the college that there has also been a clear impact on the school’s print budget with a significant reduction in paper, toner and technician call outs, simply because teachers are using OneNote rather than relying on printed handouts.

“It has also reminded teachers that teaching is constantly evolving, and evolving with technology,” Claes says, adding that it has “reinvigorated” some teachers who have really engaged with the new technology. “Some hesitant to embrace the computers and are now using them for every class.”

While it’s still too early to have developed any learning metrics to gauge the impact of the new devices – Claes says it would have to isolate some learning indicators to be able to do that – he feels that there are signs of greater learning engagement from students.

For example, they are keen users of Microsoft Teams as a collaboration platform. “They are using it as a knowledge base – and before the teachers can even get to a question someone has already answered it,” he says.

As Meynell notes; “Our students and teachers have embraced this technology. We have a strong sense of direction now and the possibilities for teaching and learning are endless.”

Learn more by contacting us.

Identity Management

Identity Management for St Mark’s Anglican School, Perth

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Identity Management (IdM) is the process of controlling information about a user from initiation to termination across a number of platforms, in a simple and cost-effective way.  Such information includes detail that authenticates the identity of a user, and information that describes information and actions they are authorized to access and/or perform across multiple platforms. IdM workflows can influence all activities of a user and can propagate name changes, security levels and ultimately the user’s digital identity.

 

The Challenge

Like most schools, St Mark’s Anglican School works with a large number of systems and prior to IdM, tasks such as multiple account creations, provisioning of home directories and email set up, account termination were a manual exercise, per user. Each system then had to be manually updated if there was a change to a user’s details or security level. This was cumbersome, and a drain on the school’s ICT Team so they looked to Solutions IT to simplify the process to create a cost-effective solution.

 

The Solution

As part of the IdM project, Solutions IT designed and built a business rules driven solution that allowed St Mark’s to automate processes that control a user’s identity. The solutions leveraged Microsoft’s identity management server (MIM 2016), a platform that allowed the school to control user’s profile across multiple systems from a central area.

 

The Results & Benefits

Not only has IdM been beneficial to manage staff and student users, but the school can also manage their parent portal using part of the MIM offering. Parent users can reset their passwords easily using a self-service automated process created by Solutions IT. Parents simply click on a link when they forget their password and an email will automatically be sent to them to allow the parent to reset their password. There is no impact on the ICT team.

 

“Solutions IT were great to work with in configuring the system and working with us to achieve our desired outcomes” Mark Dodd, IT Manager, St Mark’s Anglican.

 

For help with your IdM project, contact us

Trent Ray

#WAES Presentations

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Presentations for the WA Education Summit 2018 below. Click to download.

 

Trent Ray: Trends in Education

Trent Ray: Assessing for Future Skills

Chris McNamara (MGG) : Designing Schooling for Student Autonomy

Mary-Lou O’Brien (MGG):  Pushing Digital as a Core Company Value

Tamara Sullivan (Ormiston College): Leadership Action Matter – It Begins With You!

Melissa Marshall (Santa Maria): Gamification in Schools – with or without technology

Leigh Treacy (Fortinet): Notifiable Data Breach Scheme 

Ian Curlewis (Lavan): Privacy Act Breaches 

James Manson (Webroot): Webroot Threat Landscape

Michael Richards (Microsoft):  Securing a Microsoft Environment in the Cloud

Jason Byway (Microsoft): Managing Devices

Anthony Spiteri (Veeam): Intelligent Data Management for the Hyper-Available School

Should you have any issues in accessing these files, please contact us for help.

WAES Sponsor Special Offers

 

Lenovo

Minimum 10% off all Education RRP. Contact us for more information.

Microsoft

STEM OFFER. Offer ending Dec 31st

Fortinet

WAES delegates can access a Free Cyber Threat Assessment  for their schools- see an example report here

Veeam

3 month free licences for Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 and Veeam Agents for Microsoft Windows and Linux: https://www.veeam.com/veeam-special-offers.html

Webroot

20% off new schools with a 250 seat minimum order. Offer ending in Dec 31st. Contact us for more information.

Vivi

Keen to try out the Vivi’s screen mirroring technology used at the WA Education Summit?  Contact us to discuss how you can take advantage of their free in-school trials.

ClassVR

FREE access to the ClassVR Teacher Portal until December 2018 (Valued up to $749) when purchasing a ClassVR Headset

Solutions IT – Zuludesk

FREE training session (valued at $450) per school when purchasing Zuludesk

Notifiable Data Breaches – What Your School Needs To Know

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Notifiable Data Breaches Scheme

What Your School Needs To Know

 

The Notifiable Data Breaches (NDB) scheme came into effect on 22 February 2018, and private schools and private tertiary educational institutions across Australia will be required to comply.

This means that private schools or institutions will be required to notify students, staff, or any other individuals whose personal information is involved in a data breach that is likely to result in serious harm.

Schools may collect and store various types of personal information in both online and offline records — including photos of students, bank details, family information, contact details, and health information in the form of medical records or through counselling services. Therefore it is important that those involved in managing personal information understand their obligations under the NDB scheme.

Join Leigh Treacy, Fortinet, at the WA Education Summit to hear what schools are obliged to do under the scheme and how you can easily find the road to NDB Compliance. To register Click Here

 

Microsoft recognises Ormiston College as a world leader in education

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Microsoft recognises Ormiston College as a world leader in education

As early as October 2015, Ormiston College became a fully-fledged Microsoft Showcase School, joining an elite group of leading-edge schools from around the world. The College is now officially recognised as a mentor to other schools on a global level and is a Microsoft Showcase School.

Strategic focus on innovation

The College’s Strategic Direction has been well documented and for decades the commitment to technological transformation needed to drive learning programs for the students of tomorrow is evident.

Tamara Sullivan is the Dean of E-Learning at Ormiston College and regular coordinator of innovative ICT professional development workshops for teaching staff. Known for her innovative strategies to transform PD at a school level to develop the competencies of lifelong learning for both students AND educators, she has been integral to the success of ICT at the school.

Tamara Sullivan is the Dean of E-Learning at Ormiston College Qld and regular coordinator of innovative ICT professional development workshops for teaching staff. She will explore practical strategies to transform PD at a school level to develop the competencies of lifelong learning for both students AND educators.

Find out how Tamara’s  ICT leadership has transformed Ormiston College and hear how some of her strategies can be applied at your school by attending the WA Education Summit in May.  Click here to register

 

 

 

 

Learning for the future: Melbourne Girls Grammar

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Learning for the future: Melbourne Girls Grammar

 

Melbourne Girls Grammar’s new senior years program is a schooling model driven by a focus on well-being and a realistic approach to the skills and attributes young people need beyond school. The program allows students to take a more independent approach to learning; they work on individual schedules, on subjects of their choice and at their own pace.

Deputy principal of program design and development Chris McNamara says the program has academic excellence, enterprise and well-being at its core. “It’s really a restructure of how we do schooling in the senior years,” he says. “Our Year 9 girls are our 2020 graduates, and we believe they must have a schooling experience that meets their post-school lives. They will be working and living well past the mid-point of the 21st century.”

The Year 9s have access to one-on-one support from academic, well-being and fitness coaches, who work with students on issues such as stress. There are workshops and group sessions to help students identify common problems.

Chris is passionate about schools adapting to meet the needs of students and becoming more aligned with how students experience their world and we are delighted to have Chris speak at the WA Education Summit 2018 in May.

Hear more about how Melbourne Girls Grammar are changing the teaching and learning landscape by registering today! Register for WA Education Summit Here

 

Chris’ Session:

Designing school for student autonomy and agency; the MGGS Senior Years

– The Philosophical driver for the MGGS Senior Years
– Designing the structural blueprint – putting the student at the heart of the design
– Releasing the shackles of time that constrain the student experience of school and create the environment of control
– Wellbeing as the paradigm in which academics sit
– Acknowledging the need to diversify the workforce within Schools
– Transformational change and the need for collective action
– The expansion of expertise as the antidote to a period of consolidation